From the category archives:

Working in Schools

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fidgety studentWhether you’re working as an occupational or speech therapist in a school setting, it can be a challenge to work with kids who can’t sit still. Some children with certain conditions, such as Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and Autism Spectrum Disorder, may have sensory processing issues, which results in a decreased attention span.

In some cases, even children who don’t have a diagnosis of either condition can have trouble remaining still long enough to cooperate and get through therapy. In fact, one of the reasons some kids are referred to occupational therapy is because they have trouble sitting still in class.

Before you can develop strategies to help your students sit still, try to identify the reason behind their inability to focus. [continue reading…]

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occupational therapy with autismWorking with autistic students in school can be a rewarding yet challenging job for an occupational therapist. Whether you have experience providing therapy to autistic children or are new to working with this population, there is always something you can learn or improve on, such as the following suggestions. [continue reading…]

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school speech therapistIf you’re considering making the transition from a rehabilitation center or hospital speech therapist to a school-based therapist, there are certain traits and skills that will help you succeed. Although you need a strong desire to help people regardless of the setting you work in, there are additional traits that are helpful to becoming and succeeding as a school-based speech therapist.  Consider the list below. [continue reading…]

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school physical therapistIf you are transitioning from a clinic or hospital-based physical therapist job to a school-based PT job, you may have an idea about how they are different. After all, you know you will be working with children and teens in an educational environment as opposed to a clinical setting. Although the foundations of your responsibilities as a physical therapist are similar, there are also many differences to be aware of. Consider some of the following questions and answers regarding the differences between clinically-based and school-based PT work. [continue reading…]

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collaboration therapists parentsIf you’re an occupational therapist working in a school setting, you know collaboration between teachers, parents, and therapists is vital to the success of the student. It’s important for occupational therapists to remember that it takes a team effort to ensure maximum benefit for each student.

So how is effective collaboration defined? Collaboration may involve different things in different situations. But in general, it means working together for the common goal of helping the student reach their potential academically and socially. [continue reading…]

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school nurseAlthough the majority of nurses work in hospitals, rehab centers and home health, nurses also work in alternative settings including schools. Whether you are an experienced RN looking for a new challenge or are a recent grad considering becoming a school nurse, it’s helpful to have a good understanding of what a school nurse does and how to get started. [continue reading…]

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Six Tips to Land a Therapy Job in a School Setting

by Howard Gerber on April 14, 2016

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school therapy jobs
If you’re an occupational therapist, speech therapist, or physical therapist trying to move into school-based therapy, there are several things to consider. Although experience as a therapist in a hospital, nursing home, or rehab setting is helpful, working in a school setting is different. But with the right game plan and advanced planning, you can transition into school-based therapy. Consider some of the following suggestions: [continue reading…]

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