From the category archives:

Working in Schools

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occupational therapy playSchool-based occupational therapists often use various toys, apps, and games during therapy sessions. Incorporating play into therapy sessions can be an effective way to assess students, work towards goals, and keep children engaged in therapy. If you’re stuck on where to start with play therapy, we’ve got you covered! [continue reading…]

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OT burnoutIf you already work as a school-based occupational therapist, you probably know how rewarding it can be. Therapists help children reach their academic potential, but that’s not all. They also make a difference in a child’s overall wellbeing.

Although working as a school-based OT is fulfilling, it can also be stressful and has many challenges. Unfortunately, some therapists become burnt-out from the stress. Understanding why burnout occurs and what you can do to prevent it can help you stay on the right track. [continue reading…]

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parent involvement speechAs a school-based speech therapist, the work you do with students not only makes a difference in their academic success but also their overall quality of life as well. Speech therapy can improve social interactions, cognitive skills, and self-esteem. To provide the best care possible, it’s helpful to partner with parents.

Parents can play a vital role in reinforcing therapy. Their involvement can make a difference in how fast your students meet their goals. Parent involvement can also affect student motivation. [continue reading…]

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unmotivated studentLike all students, special needs children have various challenges, strengths, and abilities. Some children may be corporative and fully participate in therapy. The more motivated a student is, the more likely they are to try their best.

Other students may be uninterested and hard to motivate. You can’t force a student to work hard and be engaged in therapy, but you can implement several strategies to encourage them and keep them interested in therapy. [continue reading…]

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Supporting Parents of Special Need Children

by Howard Gerber on March 30, 2017

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supporting students parentsWorking as a school-based occupational, physical, or speech therapist involves not only working with students, but their parents as well. The parents of the students you work with are part of the team. Together, therapists, teachers, and parents work towards helping children reach their full potential.

Parents of special needs children need support. After you wrap up the workday with your students, you retreat to your own life. But for parents of special needs children, the work is often 24/7. Depending on the situation, caring for a special needs child can be physically, emotionally, and financially draining. The support from professionals, such as school-based therapists, can make a difference. [continue reading…]

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8 Reasons Working as a School PT is Awesome

by Howard Gerber on March 9, 2017

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school physical therapist perksWorking as a physical therapist is a great career choice. Physical therapists help people improve movement, balance and strength. Knowing this makes working as a therapist in any setting fulfilling. If you’ve ever considered working as a school-based physical therapist, it can offer even more rewards. [continue reading…]

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sensory sensitivity therapyIf you’re working as a school-based occupational, physical, or speech therapist, at some point, you’re likely to work with children with sensory processing disorder. Although it may vary, children on the autism spectrum often have sensory processing disorder. But the condition can also affect kids who are not on the autism spectrum.

Sensory processing disorder involves either hypersensitivity or hyposensitivity to sensory stimuli. The disorder can affect any sense including taste, touch, sound, sight, and smell. Some children may have hypersensitivity to one type of stimuli, such as touch. For other children, more than one sense may be involved. Usually, to be diagnosed with sensory processing disorder, the condition must interfere with everyday functioning. [continue reading…]

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