From the category archives:

Travel Nursing

The Best Destinations for Travel Nurses: Denver, Colorado

by Howard Gerber on December 20, 2012

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The Best Destinations for Travel Nurses: Denver, Colorado

For some people winter evokes dreams of the tropics. Palm trees swaying in a warm gentle breeze, the sound of the ocean and the call of seabirds providing the background music during a relaxing nap in a hammock. For others, winter only means one thing; fresh powder, bracing air, and that long lift to the top of the slopes. If a ski trip is more appealing than a sunburn, consider taking an assignment in Denver. [continue reading…]

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Negotiating your Contract

by Howard Gerber on November 29, 2012

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Negotiating your Contract

An experienced travel nurse never assumes every contract is “standard.” Nothing could be further from the truth. A good contract lays it all out: Terms, bonuses, living arrangements, sick days…the things that will define your work and life for the next few months.

An experienced recruiter will help you hammer out the details, but never be afraid to speak up and try to amend the contract to get a better deal. Before you sign off on the changes, though, make sure the recruiter or company representative has the authority to make changes.  Some potential changes and amendments may be part of the original contract; adjustments the company allows without question. Other things may not be clear, and this is where you need to ask the right questions and advocate on your own behalf. [continue reading…]

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Tax Tips for Travel Nurses

by Howard Gerber on November 22, 2012

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Tax Tips for Travel Nurses

Tax season is approaching like a freight train, and with it, that dreaded paperwork. Being a travel nurse complicates thing exponentially. Here are some things you need to know if you’re just starting out.

1. Every state has different rules, and you have to file in every state you work. Some states, like Florida, have no state income tax. Many others do, and you have to comply. You also have to pay taxes in your home state for all income earned in the US…but if you did pay income tax in another state, you can deduct it. Our best advice is to get a qualified accountant to keep track of it all.

2. Document everything. Every contract, every receipt, every expense. Since lugging around all that paper would be a recipe for disaster, track it online. There are a number of tax programs that help you organize receipts and keep track of expenses. Check out shoeboxed.com, Tax Central from H&R Block, and IRS2Go, to check on your filing status.

3. Understand that the perks may be taxable. Your living and travel expenses are extensions of your pay. Don’t be blindsided if the IRS wants a cut. [continue reading…]

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The Pros and Cons of Traveling Nursing

by Howard Gerber on November 15, 2012

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The Pros and Cons of Traveling Nursing

Thinking about a career as a traveling nurse, but aren’t sure it’s for you? There are a lot of perks, but there are some negatives as well….and some parts of the job belong on both lists, because one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. Confused? Don’t worry, you’ll see.

Pros of a Travel Nursing Career

1. The travel. Obvious? Maybe. But have you stopped to think about all that travel has to offer? You choose what assignments to accept and where to go. It’s a great way to try Boston clam chowder in Boston and visit all the historic sights…maybe ride that silly duck tour. Or accept an assignment in Cincinnati in the fall to catch a few Bengals games….or the Yankees in NY.

If sports aren’t your thing, maybe you’d like to dip into history and visit Washington D.C. and colonial Williamsburg. Or follow the warmth and hop from coast to coast for the beaches.

2. The money. Travel nursing nearly always pays more per assignment than a permanent position, but the money adds up in other ways as well. All your expenses are paid. So not only do you pocket a more than competitive salary and often an attractive bonus package, you aren’t paying all those bills that would normally come out of your salary.

3. The networking. Your average nurses in the trenches can’t meet and impress the sheer number of doctors, administrators, and other nurses. The advantage of networking is simple. Employability.  The more contacts you have, the more likely you are to get a job when you decide to settle down. Put your best foot forward and people will remember you.

4. The freedom. You’re in control of your own career. Once in a while, you’ll land a bad assignment. But it’s only for a few weeks…and then you move on. If it’s really bad, you never have to go back. Few people have that kind of career freedom. [continue reading…]

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The Best Destinations for Travel Nurses: California

by Howard Gerber on November 1, 2012

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Location in an important consideration when considering your next travel nursing assignment. It may not be the sole determining factor, but it’s pretty high on the list. Travel nursing opportunities can be found all over the country, but let’s face it, some locations and facilities have more to offer. On the flip side, less desirable locations are often more desperate and offer higher compensation in return. That’s another factor…for another day. Let’s talk about great destinations for travel nurses.

What makes a great destination for travel nurses? That’s a matter of preference, including the facility itself, the surrounding area (you have to live there), local amenities and attractions, weather, opportunities, and any number of other factors. We’ll look at one area every month to explore the best destinations for travel nurses. [continue reading…]

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From Nursing Homes to Home Care

by Howard Gerber on March 19, 2012

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Geriatric nursing may soon look very different than it has in the past. Previously, those in the field of geriatric nursing could expect to find employment in nursing homes and home health care facilities. However, with recent changes to Medicaid and Medicare, the home health care model may soon become much more prominent. Policy officials are now beginning to feel that full time medical assistance within a nursing home facility is not warranted for many of the patients who would have previously been candidates for these services. Instead, they are looking to the home health care model, where only specific services are provided within the home of the patient. [continue reading…]

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Dermatology Nursing

by Howard Gerber on July 28, 2011

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If you are a nurse who specializes in dermatology, or want to find a position in the field, there are several places you can work. Learn more about these environments, connect with others in your field with professional organizations, stay up to date on the latest news with professional journals, and follow users in the field on Twitter. [continue reading…]

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