From the category archives:

Therapy

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speech therapy trachSchool-based speech therapists work with children with a variety of hearing, communication, and language disorders. Some conditions may require the child to undergo a tracheostomy. Therapists need to have a good understanding of the challenges and impact a trach has on speech and language development in children. [continue reading…]

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school OT questionsSchool-based occupational therapists work with children to help them reach their academic potential. Therapists that think they may be a good fit for school-based therapy should consider several factors before making the leap. [continue reading…]

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occupational therapist teamOccupational therapists are often part of a multidisciplinary team to treat patients. Many of the people that receive occupational therapy can also benefit from other services and therapies. In a hospital setting, occupational therapists often work together with doctors, nurses, and discharge planners to treat patients.

A school-based occupational therapist also has a team. Working effectively with your team allows you to provide better services to your students. Your team can also be a source of information and support.

If you are new to school-based therapy, it’s helpful to learn about what each team member does and how you can work together to help your students reach their goals. [continue reading…]

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school speech therapist skillsSpeech therapists need to have certain traits and skills, such as compassion, good communication, and patience, but that’s not all. If you are planning to work as a school-based speech therapist with children, there are also additional skills and traits you need to be successful.

As a therapist, it’s important to take an honest look at the skills you need to work on. Remember most of us, could always improve on something. Below are five skills and traits, school-based therapists should master. [continue reading…]

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oppositional defiant disorder occupational therapistAs a school-based occupational therapist, you may treat children with various conditions including oppositional defiant disorder. Most children occasionally test boundaries. Teens may become a little rebellious. Toddlers might frequently say no to a caregiver and do what they want. Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) is different.

According to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, it is estimated that one to sixteen percent of school-age children have oppositional defiant disorder. Since not all children are diagnosed, it is difficult to determine an exact percentage.

The cause of oppositional defiant disorder is not fully understood. Children with the disorder often have signs of the condition from an early age. [continue reading…]

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7 Things to Avoid as a School-Based Physical Therapist

by Howard Gerber on January 25, 2018

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things to avoid in physical therapyDuring physical therapy school, you learned a lot. You know all about anatomy, human development, and therapeutic modalities. You probably also learned the importance of motivating your students, working well with teachers, and juggling the responsibilities of the job.

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5 Occupational Therapy Tools & Activities For Children

by Howard Gerber on November 30, 2017

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OT toolsSome students don’t mind having occupational therapy sessions. For other kids, therapy is a chore. Either way, providing therapy with the same old tools or activities can get boring. Students who are bored are often unmotivated. Even children who are enthusiastic about therapy, enjoy a change of pace.

Fortunately, school-based occupational therapists have all types of tools and toys to work on certain goals while still making therapy enjoyable.  Some tools are not just useful during therapy sessions. They can be helpful for teachers in the classroom who work with special needs students. Below are five types of occupational therapy tools you may want to consider. [continue reading…]

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