From the category archives:

Therapy

Holiday Blues

by Howard Gerber on December 20, 2011

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While it may not be true that suicide increases around the holiday season, it is true that many people do experience what has become known as holiday blues. This may be because people are more aware of their feelings at this time of the year or because their expectations of happiness are higher during the holidays and so they feel like they are sadder than they “should” be. Regardless, the triggers for these feelings seem to be similar regardless of the patient and many of the non-medical treatment options are viable for most patients as well. Of course it is important to remember that not all patients who feel depressed will have these “holiday blues” and may be in need of more intense treatment. [continue reading…]

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Physical Therapy in the Fall

by Howard Gerber on November 24, 2011

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With the leaves blow from the trees and snow flurries begin to flutter, consider changing up patient routines to prepare them for the new environment they are about to confront. People who have suffered an accident or injury may have been seeing you for the past several months, they may even be showing progress, but the change in the weather will likely have a few surprises in store for them. If they have never used their crutch, cane, or walker on the ice, how will they know how to do so properly? Right now, they still have the safety of familiar weather conditions, but in a few weeks, they will be facing snow and ice for possibly the very first time since they began therapy. What are you going to do to help them? [continue reading…]

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Apraxia of Speech

by Howard Gerber on November 10, 2011

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CAS, or childhood apraxia of speech, may also be known as verbal apraxia. This speech disorder is not fully understood, however, it causes the patient to be unable to fully perform the movements required to create speech. While it may be called by a variety of names, the important connection is the child has difficulty planning and following through with the actions required to speak. [continue reading…]

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Using Vestibular Swings for Your Patients

by Howard Gerber on September 27, 2011

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Vestibular swings are therapeutic devices designed to address a variety of vestibular disorders. VRT, or vestibular rehabilitation therapy, is the first line of treatment for most patients with this type of condition. The exercises designed by the therapist help to retrain the brain of the patient to compensate for their condition. Often VRT will make it possible for patients to lead a normal life without requiring surgery. This therapy is usually provided by a physical or occupational therapist. [continue reading…]

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National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month

by Howard Gerber on September 6, 2011

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September is National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month. Alcoholics and drug addicts who are no long are actively using or drinking will often tell people they are recovering rather than reformed or cured. This is because addiction is a lifelong condition. Patients who are recovering alcoholics or drug addicts work very hard to refrain from going back to the destructive path they were once on. It is important that people become aware of the difficulties associated with using drugs or consuming excessive amounts of alcohol, to know that there are options available to help with quitting, and that there are support programs to help them stay sober. [continue reading…]

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Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

by Howard Gerber on August 30, 2011

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Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, PTSD, is an anxiety disorder that occurs in individuals who have been exposed to a traumatic event. The disorder is receiving more national media attention than in the past because of the number of new cases being seen in veterans returning from the wars in the Middle East. [continue reading…]

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How many children tell their parents they should be allowed to play video games because it improves their hand-eye coordination, critical thinking skills, and ability to work in a cooperative setting? In all fairness, probably very few put it just like that but maybe they should. It turns out that playing video games, and using other forms of interactive electronics, can be quite beneficial for people. A new journal looks at specific games, and other emerging technologies, that are beneficial for mental and physical health. There are numerous indications that gaming may one day be part of speech therapy, occupational therapy, or physical therapy. [continue reading…]

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