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Therapy

Therapy Paperwork…

by Howard Gerber on July 19, 2012

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Therapy Paperwork

All forms of therapy require copious amounts of paperwork. Physical therapy is one of the more well-known examples of invasive paperwork, but occupational and speech therapists often have the same insurance restraints and requirements.

Physical therapy requires a recommendation from a patient’s doctor in order for the therapy services to be covered by most insurance policies. In this way, it is very similar to that of a specialist such as a neurologist or an oncologist. However, there is one very big difference between traditional specialists and therapists – whether they are speech, physical, or occupational. The number of therapy services a patient may receive is typically limited annually. Because of this, it is very important that therapists work closely with physicians to make sure the right service is being delivered to the patient in the most efficient manner that will satisfy the patient’s needs as well as the insurance provider’s limits. [continue reading…]

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The Importance of Physical Therapy in the Home

by Howard Gerber on June 21, 2012

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Physical therapy is an important component in a patient’s recovery process after an injury or surgical procedure. Most patients will receive therapy in an institutional setting, whether it is a rehabilitation facility, nursing home, hospital, or therapy office. However, those patients will also need to follow a home routine designed to facilitate recovery. Other patients may only be able to receive therapy in their homes due to the severity of their condition. For both types of patients, the physical therapy routine must be maintained if proper healing is to occur. [continue reading…]

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The High Cost of Therapy

by Howard Gerber on May 7, 2012

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Most people pay for medical so they won’t have to pay as much when they need health care. However, some services cost patients almost as much with insurance as without. Physical, occupational, and speech therapy are often classified the same by insurance companies as treatment received by a specialist like a cardiologist or oncologist. Because of this, the co-pay is higher for these visits, which are usually more frequent than those required by others in this category. For instance, a stroke victim may need to see a speech therapist and an occupational therapist twice a week. If their co-pay is $32, the average according to The Kaiser Family Foundation, the weekly fee can quickly become out of reach for many patients. [continue reading…]

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April is National Occupational Therapy Month

by Howard Gerber on April 2, 2012

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Sometimes we don’t give a second thought about our ability to complete simple tasks: walking to the mailbox, reading a magazine, organizing our calendars and important files, enjoying social interactions with friends and loved ones, etc. Next thing you know, suddenly things change and the abilities we once took for granted may not be counted on anymore. [continue reading…]

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Physical Therapist as Trainers

by Howard Gerber on October 18, 2010

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People usually think of calling a physical therapist after an injury has put them out of commission. This is perfectly natural and also the most common reason a physical therapist is consulted. However, with the population of the United States becoming increasingly older, physical therapists are now getting more calls for preventative care. Instead of working with patients to regain mobility, strength, or flexibility after an injury, individuals are making appointments with physical therapists to prepare for physical activity in order to avoid injury altogether. This is especially true for physical therapists who specialize in sports medicine. [continue reading…]

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Create a Safe Place for Clients in Therapy

by Angela Stevens on May 18, 2009

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Part of a successful client-patient relationship is to make therapy as successful as possible. That can be hard to do if certain pieces of the puzzle are missing. Regardless of the kind of therapy you provide for clients, they need to feel that they are in a safe environment; even if that safe place is mostly a mental state.

A person’s desire to feel safe in therapy is crucial to the success of the therapy and a natural need.  As a therapist, it is your job to ensure that your clients feel safe and have a safe place to have a therapy session before beginning. Without safety in any therapy session, your client will not be able to work towards a successful recovery. Fortunately, you can help a client feel safe no matter where you are treating them. [continue reading…]

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