Posts tagged as:

speech therapy

No Gravatar

school speech therapist skillsSpeech therapists need to have certain traits and skills, such as compassion, good communication, and patience, but that’s not all. If you are planning to work as a school-based speech therapist with children, there are also additional skills and traits you need to be successful.

As a therapist, it’s important to take an honest look at the skills you need to work on. Remember most of us, could always improve on something. Below are five skills and traits, school-based therapists should master. [continue reading…]

{ 0 comments }

No Gravatar

parent involvement speechAs a school-based speech therapist, the work you do with students not only makes a difference in their academic success but also their overall quality of life as well. Speech therapy can improve social interactions, cognitive skills, and self-esteem. To provide the best care possible, it’s helpful to partner with parents.

Parents can play a vital role in reinforcing therapy. Their involvement can make a difference in how fast your students meet their goals. Parent involvement can also affect student motivation. [continue reading…]

{ 0 comments }

Group Speech Therapy Activities

by Howard Gerber on December 1, 2016

No Gravatar

group speech activitiesGroup speech therapy can be an effective option for improving vocabulary. It makes it more fun for all students involved and also allows a single therapist to work with more students at a time, easing the overall workload.

There are multiple fun activities to improve students’ speech progress and also keep them excited and engaged. We’ve come up with several ideas to give you a start. These activities can be used for small groups of students in person or during teletherapy sessions if all activity materials are available.

[continue reading…]

{ 0 comments }

Comparing Therapy Jobs: What’s Right for You?

by Howard Gerber on May 7, 2015

No Gravatar

choosing-specialty-therapy-tips-occupational-speech-physical-therapyThere are a lot of great opportunities if you are interested in working in an allied health profession – including physical, occupational, and speech therapy. All three careers offer the chance to help people improve their functioning and quality of life. If you are trying to decide what type of therapy career suits you best, learning about each is a good first step. [continue reading…]

{ 0 comments }

The High Cost of Therapy

by Howard Gerber on May 7, 2012

No Gravatar

Most people pay for medical so they won’t have to pay as much when they need health care. However, some services cost patients almost as much with insurance as without. Physical, occupational, and speech therapy are often classified the same by insurance companies as treatment received by a specialist like a cardiologist or oncologist. Because of this, the co-pay is higher for these visits, which are usually more frequent than those required by others in this category. For instance, a stroke victim may need to see a speech therapist and an occupational therapist twice a week. If their co-pay is $32, the average according to The Kaiser Family Foundation, the weekly fee can quickly become out of reach for many patients. [continue reading…]

{ 0 comments }

No Gravatar

How many children tell their parents they should be allowed to play video games because it improves their hand-eye coordination, critical thinking skills, and ability to work in a cooperative setting? In all fairness, probably very few put it just like that but maybe they should. It turns out that playing video games, and using other forms of interactive electronics, can be quite beneficial for people. A new journal looks at specific games, and other emerging technologies, that are beneficial for mental and physical health. There are numerous indications that gaming may one day be part of speech therapy, occupational therapy, or physical therapy. [continue reading…]

{ 8 comments }

iPad Apps for Speech Therapy

by Howard Gerber on January 10, 2011

No Gravatar

Speech therapists are often the first people to work with children in a professional setting. Toddlers who show signs of having difficulty communicating may be sent to a speech therapist long before entering the public education system. For older children or adults, they may be the key to unlocking a patient’s ability to communicate with those around them. As much as speech therapists have to offer, they can’t be everywhere for each patient all the time. Until recently the only options for patients who had difficulty communicating was to spend time each week with a therapist and possibly purchase expensive equipment. For many, this equipment was prohibitively expensive and unattainable. [continue reading…]

{ 2 comments }

Page 1 of 212