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speech therapist

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parent involvement speechAs a school-based speech therapist, the work you do with students not only makes a difference in their academic success but also their overall quality of life as well. Speech therapy can improve social interactions, cognitive skills, and self-esteem. To provide the best care possible, it’s helpful to partner with parents.

Parents can play a vital role in reinforcing therapy. Their involvement can make a difference in how fast your students meet their goals. Parent involvement can also affect student motivation. [continue reading…]

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sensory sensitivity therapyIf you’re working as a school-based occupational, physical, or speech therapist, at some point, you’re likely to work with children with sensory processing disorder. Although it may vary, children on the autism spectrum often have sensory processing disorder. But the condition can also affect kids who are not on the autism spectrum.

Sensory processing disorder involves either hypersensitivity or hyposensitivity to sensory stimuli. The disorder can affect any sense including taste, touch, sound, sight, and smell. Some children may have hypersensitivity to one type of stimuli, such as touch. For other children, more than one sense may be involved. Usually, to be diagnosed with sensory processing disorder, the condition must interfere with everyday functioning. [continue reading…]

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fidgety studentWhether you’re working as an occupational or speech therapist in a school setting, it can be a challenge to work with kids who can’t sit still. Some children with certain conditions, such as Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and Autism Spectrum Disorder, may have sensory processing issues, which results in a decreased attention span.

In some cases, even children who don’t have a diagnosis of either condition can have trouble remaining still long enough to cooperate and get through therapy. In fact, one of the reasons some kids are referred to occupational therapy is because they have trouble sitting still in class.

Before you can develop strategies to help your students sit still, try to identify the reason behind their inability to focus. [continue reading…]

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Speech Therapy for the Elderly

by Angela Stevens on January 25, 2010

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I first became familiar with speech therapy when a young cousin needed help with her speech impediment. Her mother and the teachers at the school helped develop a plan to help improve her speech, which involved a weekly session with a speech therapist. I never thought much more about it until my great uncle had a stroke and lost much of his ability to speak. A speech therapist was employed by the rehabilitation nursing home he was sent to, and she helped him regain much of his ability to communicate. This made me realize that there is an amazing need for speech therapy in both the younger and older generations.

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Geriatric speech therapy has become an increasingly popular field. Baby boomers have brought the elderly population to new heights, with an even larger increase expected in the near future. This has led to an increase in the demand in speech therapists that specialize in helping elderly patients. Some of these patients need general help due to the natural aging process, while others need help with specific problems related to an underlying medical condition.

As you grow older, your vocal cords become less elastic and your larynx muscles weaken. [continue reading…]

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