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school therapist

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School-based Speech Therapists, occupational therapists, and other healthcare professionals may take classes, accept private clients, or simply rest and recharge during summer break. Before the bell rings this fall, set aside a few of those summer hours to reorganize your teaching space.

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History of Special Education

by Howard Gerber on May 13, 2019

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Fifty years ago, U.S. public schools were not legally required to educate students with disabilities. While some schools of education had already been training teachers to work in the field of special education, many children with disabilities did not attend public schools at all until schools were mandated to serve them with the passage of the Education for All Handicapped Children Act (EHA) in 1975.

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Speech therapy for autistic children is not a one size fits all treatment. Children may have different areas of communication they need help with, and speech therapy goals will often differ. It’s helpful for speech therapists to consider providing both individual therapy and depending on the child’s age, therapy in a group setting as well.

Symptoms of autism are often apparent by the age of three. The sooner language delays are recognized, and therapy can start, the better. Typically, speech-language pathologists may help children with autism in the following ways:

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sensory sensitivity therapyIf you’re working as a school-based occupational, physical, or speech therapist, at some point, you’re likely to work with children with sensory processing disorder. Although it may vary, children on the autism spectrum often have sensory processing disorder. But the condition can also affect kids who are not on the autism spectrum.

Sensory processing disorder involves either hypersensitivity or hyposensitivity to sensory stimuli. The disorder can affect any sense including taste, touch, sound, sight, and smell. Some children may have hypersensitivity to one type of stimuli, such as touch. For other children, more than one sense may be involved. Usually, to be diagnosed with sensory processing disorder, the condition must interfere with everyday functioning. [continue reading…]

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school-therapistSpeech, physical, and occupational therapists are vital to helping children who have certain challenges reach their full potential in school. Working as a therapist in a school setting can be a rewarding and satisfying career path. To be an effective school therapist, it’s helpful to keep several things in mind.  [continue reading…]

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Getting Parents Involved in School-Based Therapy

by Howard Gerber on November 3, 2016

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parent involvement in therapyWorking as a school-based occupational, physical, or speech therapist is different than working in a medical setting. In a hospital, nursing home, or rehab center, it’s great to have your patient’s family there to be supportive. But in a school-based setting, having parents or guardians involved is essential. If parents are involved, it can have the following benefits: [continue reading…]

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10 Skills School-Based Physical Therapists Need

by Howard Gerber on September 1, 2016

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school physical therapist skillsWorking as a physical therapist in a school setting is interesting, fulfilling and at times challenging. School physical therapists guide students and their families through a treatment plan that may be aimed at improving endurance, range of motion, coordination, balance, or strength.

The work of a school-based physical therapist is vital to help children overcome physical issues that may interfere with their social, emotional and academic development. Working as a school PT is not always an easy job. Having certain skills can make it easier to succeed. Consider some of the following useful skills for school-based physical therapists. [continue reading…]

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