Posts tagged as:

physical therapy

10 Skills School-Based Physical Therapists Need

by Howard Gerber on September 1, 2016

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school physical therapist skillsWorking as a physical therapist in a school setting is interesting, fulfilling and at times challenging. School physical therapists guide students and their families through a treatment plan that may be aimed at improving endurance, range of motion, coordination, balance, or strength.

The work of a school-based physical therapist is vital to help children overcome physical issues that may interfere with their social, emotional and academic development. Working as a school PT is not always an easy job. Having certain skills can make it easier to succeed. Consider some of the following useful skills for school-based physical therapists. [continue reading…]

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school physical therapistIf you are transitioning from a clinic or hospital-based physical therapist job to a school-based PT job, you may have an idea about how they are different. After all, you know you will be working with children and teens in an educational environment as opposed to a clinical setting. Although the foundations of your responsibilities as a physical therapist are similar, there are also many differences to be aware of. Consider some of the following questions and answers regarding the differences between clinically-based and school-based PT work. [continue reading…]

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Comparing Therapy Jobs: What’s Right for You?

by Howard Gerber on May 7, 2015

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choosing-specialty-therapy-tips-occupational-speech-physical-therapyThere are a lot of great opportunities if you are interested in working in an allied health profession – including physical, occupational, and speech therapy. All three careers offer the chance to help people improve their functioning and quality of life. If you are trying to decide what type of therapy career suits you best, learning about each is a good first step. [continue reading…]

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Therapy Paperwork…

by Howard Gerber on July 19, 2012

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Therapy Paperwork

All forms of therapy require copious amounts of paperwork. Physical therapy is one of the more well-known examples of invasive paperwork, but occupational and speech therapists often have the same insurance restraints and requirements.

Physical therapy requires a recommendation from a patient’s doctor in order for the therapy services to be covered by most insurance policies. In this way, it is very similar to that of a specialist such as a neurologist or an oncologist. However, there is one very big difference between traditional specialists and therapists – whether they are speech, physical, or occupational. The number of therapy services a patient may receive is typically limited annually. Because of this, it is very important that therapists work closely with physicians to make sure the right service is being delivered to the patient in the most efficient manner that will satisfy the patient’s needs as well as the insurance provider’s limits. [continue reading…]

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The Importance of Physical Therapy in the Home

by Howard Gerber on June 21, 2012

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Physical therapy is an important component in a patient’s recovery process after an injury or surgical procedure. Most patients will receive therapy in an institutional setting, whether it is a rehabilitation facility, nursing home, hospital, or therapy office. However, those patients will also need to follow a home routine designed to facilitate recovery. Other patients may only be able to receive therapy in their homes due to the severity of their condition. For both types of patients, the physical therapy routine must be maintained if proper healing is to occur. [continue reading…]

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The High Cost of Therapy

by Howard Gerber on May 7, 2012

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Most people pay for medical so they won’t have to pay as much when they need health care. However, some services cost patients almost as much with insurance as without. Physical, occupational, and speech therapy are often classified the same by insurance companies as treatment received by a specialist like a cardiologist or oncologist. Because of this, the co-pay is higher for these visits, which are usually more frequent than those required by others in this category. For instance, a stroke victim may need to see a speech therapist and an occupational therapist twice a week. If their co-pay is $32, the average according to The Kaiser Family Foundation, the weekly fee can quickly become out of reach for many patients. [continue reading…]

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Motivating Physical Therapy Patients

by Howard Gerber on January 3, 2012

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Physical therapists are heroes and villains in the story of recovery. At first, they are the villains of the story because they make the patient hurt more. The patient has dutifully been “taking it easy” for a bit after their surgery or accident and they have begun to feel a smidge better. Then they are suddenly being asked to bend, stretch, and move in ways that make the pain come back tenfold. This is, of course, a necessary component in healing and regaining full motion – but it still hurts. Usually it isn’t too terribly hard to motivate a patient to come back for their therapy appointments during this initial stage because it is all too obvious that they desperately need help to get back to their pre-injury state. However, motivating the patient to complete their exercises at home can be quite the challenge. The task of motivation becomes even more challenging once the initial phase of therapy is over and the time for maintenance begins. [continue reading…]

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