Posts tagged as:

occupational therapist

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oppositional defiant disorder occupational therapistAs a school-based occupational therapist, you may treat children with various conditions including oppositional defiant disorder. Most children occasionally test boundaries. Teens may become a little rebellious. Toddlers might frequently say no to a caregiver and do what they want. Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) is different.

According to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, it is estimated that one to sixteen percent of school-age children have oppositional defiant disorder. Since not all children are diagnosed, it is difficult to determine an exact percentage.

The cause of oppositional defiant disorder is not fully understood. Children with the disorder often have signs of the condition from an early age. [continue reading…]

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Shadowing a School-Based Occupational Therapist

by Howard Gerber on April 19, 2018

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shadow occupational therapistFor students considering a career as an occupational therapist, shadowing is one of the best ways to get an idea of what an OT does. Along with shadowing in settings, such as a hospital or clinic, it’s also beneficial to see OTs at work in other areas. Shadowing a school-based occupational therapist is one option to consider. [continue reading…]

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OT for cerebral palseyAs an occupational therapist in a school setting, you probably work with children with all types of challenges, such as autism, learning disabilities, and muscular dystrophy. It’s also common for school-based OTs to treat students with cerebral palsy. When working with children with CP, it’s important to keep several things in mind. [continue reading…]

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ot therapy boxIf you’re lucky, you have a therapy room or OT gym where you can work with your students. But not all school-based therapists have it so good. Some therapists have to adapt to their environment even if that means they treat students in empty classrooms, the cafeteria, or part of the library. Even if you have a dedicated therapy room, you may be sharing it with speech therapy and PT. You may not have the storage space to keep all your supplies. [continue reading…]

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OT burnoutIf you already work as a school-based occupational therapist, you probably know how rewarding it can be. Therapists help children reach their academic potential, but that’s not all. They also make a difference in a child’s overall wellbeing.

Although working as a school-based OT is fulfilling, it can also be stressful and has many challenges. Unfortunately, some therapists become burnt-out from the stress. Understanding why burnout occurs and what you can do to prevent it can help you stay on the right track. [continue reading…]

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unmotivated studentLike all students, special needs children have various challenges, strengths, and abilities. Some children may be corporative and fully participate in therapy. The more motivated a student is, the more likely they are to try their best.

Other students may be uninterested and hard to motivate. You can’t force a student to work hard and be engaged in therapy, but you can implement several strategies to encourage them and keep them interested in therapy. [continue reading…]

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sensory sensitivity therapyIf you’re working as a school-based occupational, physical, or speech therapist, at some point, you’re likely to work with children with sensory processing disorder. Although it may vary, children on the autism spectrum often have sensory processing disorder. But the condition can also affect kids who are not on the autism spectrum.

Sensory processing disorder involves either hypersensitivity or hyposensitivity to sensory stimuli. The disorder can affect any sense including taste, touch, sound, sight, and smell. Some children may have hypersensitivity to one type of stimuli, such as touch. For other children, more than one sense may be involved. Usually, to be diagnosed with sensory processing disorder, the condition must interfere with everyday functioning. [continue reading…]

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