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Nursing

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nursing-team-playerAs a travel nurse, there are several ways to make a good first impression. One of the best ways is by being a team player. Nursing is not a job where you can keep to yourself and go it alone. Working in a collaborative environment will make things run smoother and make your workday more enjoyable. Good teamwork also improves patient care and eases stress. [continue reading…]

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Lessons Real Nurses Can Learn from Fictional Ones

by Jeremy Winograd on May 5, 2017

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nurses week tv nursesNational Nurses Week affords our nation’s nurses some much-deserved recognition. After all, considering everything nurses do in terms of patient care, administrative work, and generally acting as the gears that make our medical system run, they rarely get the credit they earn day in and day out. On the other hand, fictional movie and TV nurses often successfully capture viewers’ hearts and imaginations, at times shaping public perception of real-life nurses and what they do. So perhaps there are a few things nurses can learn from their large and small screen counterparts that will make their patients and the general population more appreciative of their hard work? To find out which of those lessons might be most relevant, let’s take a look at a random sampling of famous fictional nurses to see what positive attributes you as a non-fictional nurse can absorb from them – and which negative ones you should seek to avoid. [continue reading…]

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How Soft Skills Help Nurses Excel

by Howard Gerber on August 25, 2016

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nurse soft skillsIt takes a lot of different skills to succeed as a nurse. Some skills are technical, such as knowing how to start an IV or change a dressing. Other skills are intellectual including calculating medication dosages or interpreting lab results.

But there are also another set of skills that are equally important for nurses to have. Soft skills are not something you can easily measure, but they are an important part of being a good nurse. [continue reading…]

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Having mass casualties arrive at the hospital you work in can be one of the most challenging times for a nurse. Mass casualty incidents may be any type of disaster or situation that involves a sudden influx of patients. For instance, mass casualty incidents may include natural disasters, such as floods, tornadoes, and hurricanes. Vehicle pileups, fires, and shootings can also result in multiple patients.

All hospitals should have a policy for dealing with mass casualty incidents. Some hospitals will have drills occasionally to help staff practice how they would handle a situation with a sudden increase in patients. [continue reading…]

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It’s normal to have a few fears when you start a new job or move to a new area to live. When you work as a nurse traveler, you combine both a new living environment and a new job. It’s no wonder you may be a little apprehensive. Keep in mind that everyone gets a little nervous starting a new travel assignment, especially if it is their first. Below are some suggestions for overcoming a few common fears nurse travelers may have.

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Starting out on the Right Foot in Nursing

by Howard Gerber on February 21, 2013

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If you’ve finally finished nursing school and started your new job, you may be wondering…what’s next? Launching a new career is one of the most exciting events in life, but it’s also nerve-wracking and overwhelming. You’ll find out pretty fast that no matter how hard you studied, you can never be 100% prepared for every situation. No school can teach every possible scenario…and no nurse can remember everything they learned right out of the gate. Take heart and don’t get discouraged. Here are some things to remember to make getting started easier.

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Home Health Care Nursing

by Howard Gerber on January 31, 2013

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Home Health Care Nursing

Nurses are unique individuals. Some love the high-stress, fast pace of a hospital or busy clinic, others like the individualized approach of a doctor’s office, and still others like the personal, one-on-one interactions best found in home healthcare. Would you be happy in such a position? Do you have the skills and the temperament?

Responsibility
One of the most important things to consider is the intense responsibility that home healthcare workers face. You’re the only one there to observe the patient and make a diagnosis. You can’t be there 24/7, so you might walk into any situation at any time; a patient who has forgotten to take his meds, who is in distress, who has had a reaction to a drug or treatment. Your assessment skills must be top rate, you don’t have the luxury of not knowing what to do, and above all, you can’t panic.

Triage Skills
When you do need support, you must be able to clearly describe the patient’s condition and recommend a course of action for approval. You’re not a doctor, but you’re there. On the spot. You know the patient, his condition, his medications, his vitals, and his wishes. You know how he reacts to care and to stress. The more concise information you can convey to a busy doctor, the better the outcome for the patient.

Decision Making
Can you act independently, make decisions, think fast on your feet? That’s the name of the game for home health workers. Today’s tools, like smartphones and tablets, make it much easier to collaborate with peers than in the past, but you’re still out there on your own most of the time. There’s nobody holding your hand or looking over your shoulder. You have to know what to do and be responsible enough to do it.

Social Skills
One thing a home health nurse should always be mindful of is personal boundaries. Even though you’re there to help, often every day, you are entering someone’s home. It’s important to remember that in order to respect your patient, you must allow them dignity and privacy. You may have to inform, educate, and even counsel family members, and carefully deal with family relationships. Families are never perfect, and long illnesses can be frustrating and strain family finances to the breaking point. Diplomacy is often your saving grace.

If this all sounds like you, home health care might be the perfect career choice. It’s personal, fiercely independent, challenging, and most definitely rewarding. You can build real relationships with patients and ensure that they get personal, consistent care.

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