Posts tagged as:

Autism

School Psychologist vs. School Counselor

by Howard Gerber on June 10, 2019

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Today’s children are more frequently diagnosed with anxiety than in the past, and are more likely to experience bullying in school. Problems like these can have negative effects on children’s mental health as well as their academic performance—and as a result, school support personnel such as school psychologists and school counselors are increasingly important for school-aged children, as well as parents, teachers and others who work with kids.

Both school psychologists and school counselors both play critical roles in the lives of students. While their roles are frequently confused, these professions are distinctly different.

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Speech therapy for autistic children is not a one size fits all treatment. Children may have different areas of communication they need help with, and speech therapy goals will often differ. It’s helpful for speech therapists to consider providing both individual therapy and depending on the child’s age, therapy in a group setting as well.

Symptoms of autism are often apparent by the age of three. The sooner language delays are recognized, and therapy can start, the better. Typically, speech-language pathologists may help children with autism in the following ways:

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sensory sensitivity therapyIf you’re working as a school-based occupational, physical, or speech therapist, at some point, you’re likely to work with children with sensory processing disorder. Although it may vary, children on the autism spectrum often have sensory processing disorder. But the condition can also affect kids who are not on the autism spectrum.

Sensory processing disorder involves either hypersensitivity or hyposensitivity to sensory stimuli. The disorder can affect any sense including taste, touch, sound, sight, and smell. Some children may have hypersensitivity to one type of stimuli, such as touch. For other children, more than one sense may be involved. Usually, to be diagnosed with sensory processing disorder, the condition must interfere with everyday functioning. [continue reading…]

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Sensory-Friendly Experiences for Children with Autism

by Jeremy Winograd on January 26, 2017

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sensory friendly facilitiesFor parents and caretakers with autistic kids, simply venturing out the door and into public can sometimes be risky business. The vibrant crowds, bright colors, and noisy hubbub that may delight most kids can quickly trigger autistic children’s hypersensitivity to sights, sounds, and smells. Fortunately, as public acceptance and understanding of autism has increased, so too have the number of companies and other institutions willing to do more to accommodate the peculiarities of the condition that affects so many. Here are just a few of the sensory-friendly experiences that have recently begun to make going out less daunting for tykes with autism. [continue reading…]

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occupational therapy with autismWorking with autistic students in school can be a rewarding yet challenging job for an occupational therapist. Whether you have experience providing therapy to autistic children or are new to working with this population, there is always something you can learn or improve on, such as the following suggestions. [continue reading…]

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Autism and Occupational Therapy

by Howard Gerber on July 21, 2011

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Autism, or autism spectrum disorders, is used to describe a variety of developmental disorders and is usually diagnosed around the age of three. Because there are so many different conditions this broad term is used to describe, it may be difficult for patients of the “same” condition (or their parents) to understand why the occupational therapy regimes may differ so widely. It is important that occupational therapy be tailored to each individual patient, rather than a single regime be applied to all patients indiscriminately because each patient faces his or her own unique challenges. [continue reading…]

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Autism and Speech Therapy

by Howard Gerber on November 11, 2010

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Autism is a broad term that actually describes a wide spectrum of symptoms. A child with autism may be mostly nonverbal or they may be verbal but find communicating with others to be quite difficult. The range of speech in children diagnosed with autism is quite wide. Speech therapy can help children at both ends of the spectrum. A person with autism who is quite verbal may have a very difficult time comprehending the complex nuances within language. A nonverbal patient can learn to communicate without, or with limited speech, and with time may improve their spoken skill to a level where they can communicate with people more easily. [continue reading…]

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