From the category archives:

Special Education

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school nurseAlthough the majority of nurses work in hospitals, rehab centers and home health, nurses also work in alternative settings including schools. Whether you are an experienced RN looking for a new challenge or are a recent grad considering becoming a school nurse, it’s helpful to have a good understanding of what a school nurse does and how to get started. [continue reading…]

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Six Tips to Land a Therapy Job in a School Setting

by Howard Gerber on April 14, 2016

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school therapy jobs
If you’re an occupational therapist, speech therapist, or physical therapist trying to move into school-based therapy, there are several things to consider. Although experience as a therapist in a hospital, nursing home, or rehab setting is helpful, working in a school setting is different. But with the right game plan and advanced planning, you can transition into school-based therapy. Consider some of the following suggestions: [continue reading…]

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Summer Learning!

by Christy Trujillo on July 10, 2014

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ot-slp-conferences-2014In addition to some rest and relaxation this summer, you might want to brush up on your skills or tackle the CEUs you’ll need this year. Conferences are a great way to do this, since many of them fill those requirements and offer a bit of fun and camaraderie at the same time. We’ve listed some events going on this summer and some that you’ll need to register for ASAP, before all the spots are taken. We’ve also found a few webinars and online conferences for those who prefer to stay close to home. [continue reading…]

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Therapy Paperwork…

by Howard Gerber on July 19, 2012

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Therapy Paperwork

All forms of therapy require copious amounts of paperwork. Physical therapy is one of the more well-known examples of invasive paperwork, but occupational and speech therapists often have the same insurance restraints and requirements.

Physical therapy requires a recommendation from a patient’s doctor in order for the therapy services to be covered by most insurance policies. In this way, it is very similar to that of a specialist such as a neurologist or an oncologist. However, there is one very big difference between traditional specialists and therapists – whether they are speech, physical, or occupational. The number of therapy services a patient may receive is typically limited annually. Because of this, it is very important that therapists work closely with physicians to make sure the right service is being delivered to the patient in the most efficient manner that will satisfy the patient’s needs as well as the insurance provider’s limits. [continue reading…]

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Summer Break or Continuing Education?

by Howard Gerber on July 12, 2012

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Summer Break or Continuing Education

Many people look at the job of teaching as a little bit of work with a lot of vacations. Summer vacation alone is more time off from work than most people get in several years in other careers. Then there is spring break and winter break and all of the other little three day weekends sprinkled throughout the rest of the year. Right? No, not really. [continue reading…]

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Why Pursue a Graduate Degree in Special Education

by Howard Gerber on June 13, 2012

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It takes true love for the field of education and a dedication to special needs students to remain very long in the realm of special education. The hours are even longer than those of a classroom teacher, summer meetings are routine, the emotional turmoil from parents and distressed children can be overwhelming, and the monetary benefit is typically equal to that of a classroom teacher. Why then, would anyone want to put forth the effort and money required to pursue a graduate degree in the field of special education? The two reasons that immediately come to mind are knowledge and change. [continue reading…]

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Educational Games in the Classroom

by Howard Gerber on February 23, 2012

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One of the reasons ESE students have so much trouble in traditional classroom settings is because their learning styles are atypical. Lectures, taking notes, and reading chapter after chapter are simply not the way they learn best. ESOL students also have trouble when placed in a classroom at first because they simply don’t understand what is being said or what they are being asked to read. This is where games can be a lifesaver for the children and the teachers. Try one of these educational games to help encourage your unique learners. [continue reading…]

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