From the category archives:

Nursing

4 Ways to Improve Your Nursing Resume

by Howard Gerber on October 18, 2012

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4 Ways to Improve Your Nursing Resume

When you’re working with a recruiter to help you find employment in the field of nursing, you know that your resume is going to be seen quite often by a number of people. How can you make your nursing resume stand out from among the sea of other candidates? We have four tips for improving your nursing resume.

http://allhealthcare.monster.com/careers/articles/3843-7-best-resume-tips-for-nurses?page=2

  1. Summarize your qualifications.
    There is a lot of information on your resume, and depending on how many resumes a person is looking at before deciding who gets an interview, your strengths may not get noticed in the sea of words on the page. Start out with a qualifications summary that will tell the person making the hiring decision why you are the right person for the job. This includes your employment objective, how much experience you have, what your specialty is, and any other important information you want them to know.
  2. Prepare your resume for electronic search.
    You may not even have a human being looking over your resume before the interview; the hiring institution may be using an electronic search to find only individuals who mention certain areas of expertise in their resumes. You must include these keywords in the text of your resume. If you’ve done a lot of work with kids, make sure you use the word pediatrics. If you’ve worked the ER, use the words emergency department or emergency medicine. If you don’t list these keywords, you may get overlooked.
  3. Showcase your strengths by using the right format.
    If you’re fresh out of nursing school, you don’t want to fashion your resume in a manner that emphasizes your lack of experience. Highlight your academic honors and accomplishments, licensure, and clinical rotations. If you do have the experience, spell out not only your job duties, but things you did to go above and beyond your job title. Were you a trainer? Did you help your department during JCAHO accreditation? Did you receive any commendations? Highlight the things that will show a potential employer that they’d be getting more bang for their buck by hiring you.
  4. Be specific.
    What type of facilities have you worked at? It’s not enough to list the name of your past employers and the dates you worked for them; there are literally thousands of facilities out there, and chances are that the hiring manager has no idea what sort of reputation any particular facility has. Was it an outpatient facility, general practice, intensive care? How many patients were on your caseload on any given day? What was your specialty? These are all important determinations to help a hiring manager know whether or not you’d be a good fit.

When was the last time you updated your resume? Do you have any additional tips that have helped you?

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Guiding Principles for Patient Engagement

by Howard Gerber on August 23, 2012

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Guiding Principles for Patient Engagement

In the effort to create a more sustainable healthcare system, the concept of patient engagement has garnered plenty of attention. Recently, the Nursing Alliance for Quality Care (NAQC) recently released guidelines for high-quality care that directly involves the patient. NAQC hopes to get the nursing community onboard in order to improve patient outcomes by improving communication and information flow. Many of the guidelines will be familiar to nurses, since their jobs traditionally include ongoing interaction with patients and their families, but the intent is to provide a consistent care framework with established standards for patient engagement. [continue reading…]

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Nurses Light up the Olympic Cermony Stage

by Howard Gerber on August 2, 2012

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Nurses Light up the Olympic Ceremony Stage

 In one of the quirkiest and most humorous opening ceremonies ever, Great Britain really put on a show at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. Amid the cadre of the umbrella-wielding Mary Poppins descending, the flock of sheep, Lord Voldemort, the Sex Pistols, Paul McCartney, and a rustic village, 800 doctors and nurses put on their dancing shoes and joined the show in a musical number dedicated to the National Health Service. [continue reading…]

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From Nursing Homes to Home Care

by Howard Gerber on March 19, 2012

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Geriatric nursing may soon look very different than it has in the past. Previously, those in the field of geriatric nursing could expect to find employment in nursing homes and home health care facilities. However, with recent changes to Medicaid and Medicare, the home health care model may soon become much more prominent. Policy officials are now beginning to feel that full time medical assistance within a nursing home facility is not warranted for many of the patients who would have previously been candidates for these services. Instead, they are looking to the home health care model, where only specific services are provided within the home of the patient. [continue reading…]

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Disclosing Medical Errors: A Nurse’s Role

by Howard Gerber on January 26, 2012

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Everyone makes mistakes in their personal life and in their professional life. This is true for all people in all professions. However, it is more important when a mistake is made in the field of medicine because it can result in the death of a patient. It can be scary to admit to someone that you have made a mistake, and terrifying if that mistake may have negatively affected their health. However, it is one of the most important parts of a nurse’s job. [continue reading…]

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Postpartum Depression

by Howard Gerber on January 5, 2012

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Postpartum depression (PPD) is not just a little bit of sadness after a baby is born that is the result of hormone levels returning to normal, although that can certainly be the case for some women. For some women, though, it is a debilitating depression that can last for months or years after the birth of the baby, putting both mother and baby in danger. There are three different levels, all of which are related to postpartum depression: baby blues, postpartum depression, and postpartum psychosis. [continue reading…]

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Motivating Physical Therapy Patients

by Howard Gerber on January 3, 2012

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Physical therapists are heroes and villains in the story of recovery. At first, they are the villains of the story because they make the patient hurt more. The patient has dutifully been “taking it easy” for a bit after their surgery or accident and they have begun to feel a smidge better. Then they are suddenly being asked to bend, stretch, and move in ways that make the pain come back tenfold. This is, of course, a necessary component in healing and regaining full motion – but it still hurts. Usually it isn’t too terribly hard to motivate a patient to come back for their therapy appointments during this initial stage because it is all too obvious that they desperately need help to get back to their pre-injury state. However, motivating the patient to complete their exercises at home can be quite the challenge. The task of motivation becomes even more challenging once the initial phase of therapy is over and the time for maintenance begins. [continue reading…]

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