From the category archives:

Healthcare Workers

Are You Cut Out to Work in Emergency Medicine?

by Howard Gerber on October 25, 2012

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Are You Cut Out to Work in Emergency Medicine?

The emergency department is an important part of any hospital, and the medical staff in the ER often has to make split-second decisions that are literally a matter of life and death. These men and women make a difference in people’s lives every day. Do you want to be one of them?

Making a Difference in the ER

From triage to emergency room nurse in the trenches, you will be taking care of patients in a time of crisis and intense need. Emergency room physicians are responsible for treating patients at various levels of trauma, and emergency room nurses are there to support both the doctors and the patients. If you’ve ever been a patient or the family member of a patient in the ER, you know how much it means to know the medical professionals are doing their best to help you or your loved one, and how grateful you can be afterward to those people. By working in emergency medicine, you can be one of those professionals that patients are so grateful for every day.

Fast-Paced Environment Where No Two Days are the Same

Life as an emergency medicine professional means that you will see a variety of patients presenting with a wide array of injuries and illnesses, from broken bones and severed fingers to heart attacks and strokes. You can learn a lot about conditions you’d never see working in general practice or even the ICU. Though there may be slow periods every once in a while, it’s almost guaranteed that you’ll never be bored working in the emergency department. You need to be sure you can physically and mentally handle being on-your-feet busy throughout every shift.

Trauma and Death

Because of the nature of emergency medicine, you will be exposed to the sort of trauma they can’t sure during prime time on even the goriest medical dramas. Gaping wounds, severed limbs, multiple gunshot wounds, bizarre worksite injuries – you’ll be up close and personal with all of them. You’ll need to come to terms with the fact that not every patient can be saved, either. The severity of illness and injury may be too great to “fix” or cure by even the most skilled medical professionals, and you will have to face patient death on a regular basis. If you do not think you can handle this mentally and emotionally, the emergency department is probably not for you, or your work will tear you apart.

Do you work in the emergency department, or have you ever done an emergency medicine rotation? What else do you think is important for medical professionals who are considering a career in emergency medicine?

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Travel Nursing – Is Your Skill List Up-to-Date?

by Howard Gerber on October 4, 2012

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Travel Nursing – Is Your Skill List Up-to-Date?

So you’re ready to start travel nursing. You’ve got the education and experience, your resume is newly polished and you’ve prepared for those tricky interview questions. Have you forgotten anything?

If you’re using a recruiter affiliated with a service – which I highly recommend – it’s a good idea to make a list of your skills, talents, and competencies. This helps the recruiter match you up with jobs that are perfect for you…and helps avoid wasting time on jobs that are not. [continue reading…]

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Nurses Light up the Olympic Cermony Stage

by Howard Gerber on August 2, 2012

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Nurses Light up the Olympic Ceremony Stage

 In one of the quirkiest and most humorous opening ceremonies ever, Great Britain really put on a show at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. Amid the cadre of the umbrella-wielding Mary Poppins descending, the flock of sheep, Lord Voldemort, the Sex Pistols, Paul McCartney, and a rustic village, 800 doctors and nurses put on their dancing shoes and joined the show in a musical number dedicated to the National Health Service. [continue reading…]

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Therapy Paperwork…

by Howard Gerber on July 19, 2012

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Therapy Paperwork

All forms of therapy require copious amounts of paperwork. Physical therapy is one of the more well-known examples of invasive paperwork, but occupational and speech therapists often have the same insurance restraints and requirements.

Physical therapy requires a recommendation from a patient’s doctor in order for the therapy services to be covered by most insurance policies. In this way, it is very similar to that of a specialist such as a neurologist or an oncologist. However, there is one very big difference between traditional specialists and therapists – whether they are speech, physical, or occupational. The number of therapy services a patient may receive is typically limited annually. Because of this, it is very important that therapists work closely with physicians to make sure the right service is being delivered to the patient in the most efficient manner that will satisfy the patient’s needs as well as the insurance provider’s limits. [continue reading…]

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The High Cost of Therapy

by Howard Gerber on May 7, 2012

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Most people pay for medical so they won’t have to pay as much when they need health care. However, some services cost patients almost as much with insurance as without. Physical, occupational, and speech therapy are often classified the same by insurance companies as treatment received by a specialist like a cardiologist or oncologist. Because of this, the co-pay is higher for these visits, which are usually more frequent than those required by others in this category. For instance, a stroke victim may need to see a speech therapist and an occupational therapist twice a week. If their co-pay is $32, the average according to The Kaiser Family Foundation, the weekly fee can quickly become out of reach for many patients. [continue reading…]

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Prescription to Nonprescription: A Pharmacist’s Role

by Howard Gerber on April 23, 2012

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The FDA is considering expanding the definition of what can be considered a nonprescription drug. The reasoning behind the possible new policy is the FDA wants to streamline healthcare. Studies have found that up to 20% of patients will not get prescriptions filled or they will not return to a physician to get prescriptions for refills. Moving some of the most common medications to nonprescription status would decrease the number of visits to physicians and may increase the likelihood that patients who need these medications will get them. [continue reading…]

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Occupational Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis

by Howard Gerber on April 9, 2012

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Most people think of physical therapy and occupational therapy as something that is needed after an accident or surgery. While one of these is often the impetus behind a therapy referral, there are other common ailments that can be addressed with the proper therapy regimen. Rheumatoid arthritis is one such condition. The disease can be excruciatingly painful and can limit the ability of the patient to perform common tasks. Fortunately, occupational therapy can help patients retain motion and even regain abilities that have been lost due to disease progression. [continue reading…]

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