Interview with Nurse Nacole

by Howard Gerber on December 17, 2015

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Nurse NacoleLast month, as part of National Hospice and Palliative Care Month, we got to know a lot of the great nurses who make a huge difference to the lives of the people they care for. Many of the stories were inspiring and moving; as a result, we’ve decided to feature the nurses that keep us doing what we do. This month, we would like to introduce Nurse Nacole, a Florida-based nurse and Youtuber/blogger working within intensive care.


Tell us a little bit about your background. What led you into the hospice and care industry and how long have you been a physician/blogger/expert?

My name is Nacole Riccaboni. I’m an ICU RN in Orlando, Florida. I work on a multisystem intensive care unit (hospital setting). I often manage the care of individuals entering hospice. Usually, they are discharged from the hospital (inpatient setting) and transferred into hospice care (outpatient setting). This allows the patient and family members privacy and comfort in the final transition phase of life. I’ve been a nurse since 2011 and it’s a very rewarding career. I’m there when people are at their worst and I help them medically, emotionally and spiritually.

What can our readers expect to find on your blog?

Readers can expect daily nursing tips and tools that will help nurses manage the care of individuals in all different settings of healthcare.

How do you think the public perception of what nurses/carers do compares to the reality of the job?

The perception is often inaccurate. We aren’t scantily clad individuals, kissing in closets. We are educated, capable individuals who want to impact our community for the better. We are patient advocates. We fight to make sure our patients are heard and understood. We care so much; we often ignore our own health and needs.

What are the most common misconceptions of hospices?

The most common misconception is that once you enter hospice, no one will truly care about you or for you. Often the fear is related to being ignored as a human being. That is far from the truth. The goal of hospice is to provide individualized care, close monitoring and decency while the patient experiences a terminal disease process.

What are your top tips for finding the best hospice for your loved one?

Do your research and visit the establishment. Often family members pick a location based on geographical location alone and sometimes regret their choice. If you have the time, visit the location and meet the staff. Make sure it is the right fit for your needs. Make sure the staff understands what your family needs during this time.

Finally, is there one piece of advice you would give to a nurse, physician or care worker at the start of their career?

Be kind. Working in the medical field can sometimes make healthcare providers clinical and cold. When you taking care of people… don’t forget there are people, they are human. Respect their choices, help them in any way you can and be their advocate.

You can read Nacole’s blog here: ‪http://www.nursenacole.com and follow her on Twitter at @CoronaryKid

 

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