From the category archives:

Healthcare News

Prescription to Nonprescription: A Pharmacist’s Role

by Howard Gerber on April 23, 2012

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The FDA is considering expanding the definition of what can be considered a nonprescription drug. The reasoning behind the possible new policy is the FDA wants to streamline healthcare. Studies have found that up to 20% of patients will not get prescriptions filled or they will not return to a physician to get prescriptions for refills. Moving some of the most common medications to nonprescription status would decrease the number of visits to physicians and may increase the likelihood that patients who need these medications will get them. [continue reading…]

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Occupational Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis

by Howard Gerber on April 9, 2012

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Most people think of physical therapy and occupational therapy as something that is needed after an accident or surgery. While one of these is often the impetus behind a therapy referral, there are other common ailments that can be addressed with the proper therapy regimen. Rheumatoid arthritis is one such condition. The disease can be excruciatingly painful and can limit the ability of the patient to perform common tasks. Fortunately, occupational therapy can help patients retain motion and even regain abilities that have been lost due to disease progression. [continue reading…]

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From Nursing Homes to Home Care

by Howard Gerber on March 19, 2012

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Geriatric nursing may soon look very different than it has in the past. Previously, those in the field of geriatric nursing could expect to find employment in nursing homes and home health care facilities. However, with recent changes to Medicaid and Medicare, the home health care model may soon become much more prominent. Policy officials are now beginning to feel that full time medical assistance within a nursing home facility is not warranted for many of the patients who would have previously been candidates for these services. Instead, they are looking to the home health care model, where only specific services are provided within the home of the patient. [continue reading…]

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Postpartum Depression

by Howard Gerber on January 5, 2012

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Postpartum depression (PPD) is not just a little bit of sadness after a baby is born that is the result of hormone levels returning to normal, although that can certainly be the case for some women. For some women, though, it is a debilitating depression that can last for months or years after the birth of the baby, putting both mother and baby in danger. There are three different levels, all of which are related to postpartum depression: baby blues, postpartum depression, and postpartum psychosis. [continue reading…]

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Seasonal Affective Disorder

by Howard Gerber on December 29, 2011

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Seasonal affective disorder is aptly referred to as SAD, because the people suffering from the disorder often diagnose themselves as being simply sad at first. While there are variations of seasonal affective disorder that affect people during the spring and summer, most cases begin sometime in the fall and last throughout the winter with symptoms finally subsiding in the spring. [continue reading…]

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Pulmonary Nursing

by Howard Gerber on December 1, 2011

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Pulmonary nursing, also known as respiratory nursing, is one of the many specialties available to nurses. Choosing a specialty is a great choice for those who really love a specific field. It can also be a good way to find higher paying positions. [continue reading…]

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Physical Therapy in the Fall

by Howard Gerber on November 24, 2011

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With the leaves blow from the trees and snow flurries begin to flutter, consider changing up patient routines to prepare them for the new environment they are about to confront. People who have suffered an accident or injury may have been seeing you for the past several months, they may even be showing progress, but the change in the weather will likely have a few surprises in store for them. If they have never used their crutch, cane, or walker on the ice, how will they know how to do so properly? Right now, they still have the safety of familiar weather conditions, but in a few weeks, they will be facing snow and ice for possibly the very first time since they began therapy. What are you going to do to help them? [continue reading…]

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