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Healthcare News

Social Media – Hospitals Getting into the Act

by Howard Gerber on January 3, 2013

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Social Media – Hospitals Getting into the Act

Last year, a patient at Seattle Children’s Hospital had a bright idea that caught fire. Patients and staff joined in a fun project, to lip-synch and dance to Kelly Clarkson’s “Stronger.” The idea for the project came from 22-year-old leukemia patient, Chris Rumble, who wanted to send a message of strength and hope to his hockey team after they sent him a video for his birthday. With help of film students from Seattle University, the project came together. The finished product was uploaded to YouTube in May of 2012, and it quickly went viral. Today, millions of people have seen the video.

The video was part of an ongoing project at Seattle Children’s Hospital called Not Now. The project gives a voice to adolescents and young adults struggling to cope with cancer; a chance to tell their story in a creative way and connect with peers. Today, there are many videos attributed to the project, including a video about the making of “Stronger,” “Chemo Barbie,” and “The Bieber Bet.”

St. Jude’s raises the stakes
Just recently, St. Jude’s entered the fray with “Hey St. Jude’s,” a video set to the Beatles “Hey Jude.” The video features patients, nurses, doctors, and staff, heavily interspersed with a wide variety of singers and celebrities singing the words. While not as spontaneous or as joyful as Seattle Children’s effort, it’s sure to be a hit.

What’s the point?
Many hospitals are in financial trouble. They are squeezed between government restrictions, insurance companies trying to maximize profits at patient expense, and the rising cost of specialty care for long-term diseases like cancer. Jumping on the social media bandwagon with an appealing video that might go viral puts a face on tragedy and raises awareness, but it also raises money. When bloggers, Tumblrs, Facebookers and Twitterers share the video with their friends and fans they often include a call to donate and a link to the donations page, which helps offset the costs of those things that make the hospitals affordable and special. Social media is a powerful tool…and you can use it.

Leveraging social media savvy
By now you’re asking…how does this apply to me? I’m not a hospital. You’re right. You’re not. But huge successful projects start with a person and an idea. Imagine your career marketability if, in your background, you started a project that raised $100k for a medical facility. Who wouldn’t want you on their staff? To get started, build your social media presence. Choose a look –colors, artwork, and tone—that represents you, your work, and your audience. Repeat that look and feel across several key social networking sites, and build an audience. Don’t take on too many, there are a million social sites, and you probably need to save some time to actually work. People will follow you if you post interesting, provocative, useful material. The more powerful your social network, the more influence you’ll have when the time comes to launch a money-making effort of your own.

In the meantime, here are the links to donate to Seattle Children’s and St. Jude’s

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How Employers are Narrowing the Field

by Howard Gerber on December 27, 2012

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How Employers are Narrowing the Field

So there you are, brand new nursing degree in hand, ready to start your first job or take your experience to a new job. You should be aware, though, that hiring isn’t what it used to be. HR departments are high-tech and savvy, and they are looking at more than just your resume to make a decision.

Even in a field with plenty of job openings, the competition can be fierce. As an applicant, it’s up to you to make sure your resume is not only up to date, but properly formatted…and that a web search won’t turn up reasons not to hire you. [continue reading…]

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Top Five Gifts for Healthcare Professionals This Season

by Howard Gerber on December 11, 2012

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The holiday season is all about giving. Unfortunately, figuring out what to buy everyone can give you a headache.

But this year, you don’t have to stress out looking for the perfect present for the busy medical professional in your life. These five gifts are sure to be a big hit during the holidays:

1.  Intelliskin Performance Shirt

Medical professionals have to stand for hours on end, which can put a huge strain on their backs. The IntelliSkin can help alleviate this pain, as it is scientifically designed to retrain the body to achieve optimal muscular balance and function through proper alignment and quality of movement. Created by a sports medicine expert and accomplished athlete, the IntelliSkin Performance Shirt incorporates advanced sports science, medical research and design and construction to naturally trigger an instant, predictable sensorimotor response.

 

2.  Medelita Scrubs Set

Put some style into your healthcare pro’s scrubs with these professional Medelita scrubs. With specific styles for men and women, Medelita scrubs are functional and a lot more flattering than traditional unisex scrubs. They can be personalized with a custom logo, name and embroidery, and come in a variety of colors to suit any personality or facility.

 

3.  A Day at the Spa!

Give the gift of relaxation with a SpaFinder gift certificate. Accepted at over 20,000 locations worldwide, these gift certificates can be used for beauty packages, yoga classes, Pilates sessions, fitness studios and more. Starting at just $25, you can chose to print a gift cart instantly, send an eGift Card via email or have a certificate mailed to a lucky recipient.

 

4. Stethoscope Tag

A Stethoscope Tag is sure to bring a little bling into the exam room. Extremely affordable, these tags are an excellent way for the doctor, nurse, or technician in your life to keep track of which stethoscope is theirs! Also, the tag can serve as a touching personal reminder of who gave it to them on those very stressful days.

 

 

5. Kindle Paperwhite

Amazon’s Kindle Paperwhite is one of the world’s most advanced e-readers. Featuring an exceptionally sharp and clear resolution, a built-in adjustable light, 8-hour battery life and a sleek design, the Kindle Paperwhite is the perfect gift for a healthcare professional who likes to catch up on reading in-between shifts.

 

Take our gift guide with you on the go. Download a copy now!

 

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October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

by Howard Gerber on October 11, 2012

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October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

No matter your role, if you work with adult women in the healthcare industry, it is important to discuss breast cancer with your patients or clients. Nurses are especially well positioned to talk to women about this important issue, since caring for a patient’s overall health is part of the job.

Monthly Breast Self-Exams

Do your patients know how to perform self-exams on their breasts? Though studies have questioned the necessity of breast self-exams due to the low rate of discovery in this manner, there is anecdotal evidence that self-checks can aid in early detection. Myself, I know a woman who discovered a lump in her own breast during a self-exam, and she has been a breast care survivor for over 15 years. So even though it is unlikely that a woman will discover breast cancer before her doctor can, isn’t even one woman’s life saved worth it? Self-exams have no cost to the patient and are easy to do, so I would encourage female patients to take their health into their own hands.

Annual Clinical Breast Exams and Mammograms

If you work in a primary care or OB/GYN practice, you know how often your patients are coming in for their clinical exams. It may be a good idea to send mailers to the patients in your practice during October to remind them of the importance of coming in for their annual exams, which will include checking for breast cancer. If you work outside one of these offices, posters and other educations materials can help remind your female patients to see their physicians, stressing the fact that early detection is what helps save lives.

It may be important to stress that, while mammograms are unpleasant, they are really the best tool we have right now for detecting breast cancer. Too many women avoid mammograms due to discomfort and embarrassment, so they need to be reminded that the discomfort is only temporary, and it could end up being the difference between going into remission or listening to the doctor talk about life expectancy.

Are Women Aware?

With everything going pink for the month of October, it’s hard to think that anyone could possibly not be aware of breast cancer. But simple awareness of this disease’s existence is quite different from awareness of how important early detection can be. How do you educate your patients about breast cancer?

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Travel Nursing – Is Your Skill List Up-to-Date?

by Howard Gerber on October 4, 2012

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Travel Nursing – Is Your Skill List Up-to-Date?

So you’re ready to start travel nursing. You’ve got the education and experience, your resume is newly polished and you’ve prepared for those tricky interview questions. Have you forgotten anything?

If you’re using a recruiter affiliated with a service – which I highly recommend – it’s a good idea to make a list of your skills, talents, and competencies. This helps the recruiter match you up with jobs that are perfect for you…and helps avoid wasting time on jobs that are not. [continue reading…]

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Kidney Stone Season

by Howard Gerber on September 27, 2012

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Kidney Stone Season

There’s only one way to beat the summer heat in the South: a tall, cool glass of sweet iced tea… which may be why so many southerners suffer from kidney stones. Dehydration is the major cause of kidney stones, but incidents are trending up drastically over the last decade, as much as 30%. Doctors who specialize in such studies strongly suspect the culprit is the American diet.

Kidney stones are formed when a concentration of minerals collects in the kidney, often forming jagged constructions that are painful and difficult to pass. During the summer, people sweat out more fluid, leaving the kidneys high and dry, a perfect environment to foster the growth of stones. It’s a common problem, affecting about 10% of all Americans. People who form one are far more likely to have more. [continue reading…]

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Care for a Brain Wash? Potential New Insight to Alzheimers

by Howard Gerber on September 20, 2012

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Care for a Brain Wash? Potential New Insight to Alzheimers

The brain, and the effects of aging, are still widely misunderstood. But new research reported by researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center sheds light on something new and different, a drainage system that periodically washes the brain down. They discovered that in a healthy brain, cerebrospinal fluid circulates constantly, washing out proteins that build up and might lead to Alzheimer’s. The proteins are carried away through the cells and into the body, where they can be harmlessly absorbed. The researchers called the cleaning system the “glymphatic system,” because it’s similar to the lymphatic system and facilitated by glial cells. [continue reading…]

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