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Healthcare Jobs

Are You Cut Out to Work in Emergency Medicine?

by Howard Gerber on October 25, 2012

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Are You Cut Out to Work in Emergency Medicine?

The emergency department is an important part of any hospital, and the medical staff in the ER often has to make split-second decisions that are literally a matter of life and death. These men and women make a difference in people’s lives every day. Do you want to be one of them?

Making a Difference in the ER

From triage to emergency room nurse in the trenches, you will be taking care of patients in a time of crisis and intense need. Emergency room physicians are responsible for treating patients at various levels of trauma, and emergency room nurses are there to support both the doctors and the patients. If you’ve ever been a patient or the family member of a patient in the ER, you know how much it means to know the medical professionals are doing their best to help you or your loved one, and how grateful you can be afterward to those people. By working in emergency medicine, you can be one of those professionals that patients are so grateful for every day.

Fast-Paced Environment Where No Two Days are the Same

Life as an emergency medicine professional means that you will see a variety of patients presenting with a wide array of injuries and illnesses, from broken bones and severed fingers to heart attacks and strokes. You can learn a lot about conditions you’d never see working in general practice or even the ICU. Though there may be slow periods every once in a while, it’s almost guaranteed that you’ll never be bored working in the emergency department. You need to be sure you can physically and mentally handle being on-your-feet busy throughout every shift.

Trauma and Death

Because of the nature of emergency medicine, you will be exposed to the sort of trauma they can’t sure during prime time on even the goriest medical dramas. Gaping wounds, severed limbs, multiple gunshot wounds, bizarre worksite injuries – you’ll be up close and personal with all of them. You’ll need to come to terms with the fact that not every patient can be saved, either. The severity of illness and injury may be too great to “fix” or cure by even the most skilled medical professionals, and you will have to face patient death on a regular basis. If you do not think you can handle this mentally and emotionally, the emergency department is probably not for you, or your work will tear you apart.

Do you work in the emergency department, or have you ever done an emergency medicine rotation? What else do you think is important for medical professionals who are considering a career in emergency medicine?

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4 Ways to Improve Your Nursing Resume

by Howard Gerber on October 18, 2012

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4 Ways to Improve Your Nursing Resume

When you’re working with a recruiter to help you find employment in the field of nursing, you know that your resume is going to be seen quite often by a number of people. How can you make your nursing resume stand out from among the sea of other candidates? We have four tips for improving your nursing resume.

http://allhealthcare.monster.com/careers/articles/3843-7-best-resume-tips-for-nurses?page=2

  1. Summarize your qualifications.
    There is a lot of information on your resume, and depending on how many resumes a person is looking at before deciding who gets an interview, your strengths may not get noticed in the sea of words on the page. Start out with a qualifications summary that will tell the person making the hiring decision why you are the right person for the job. This includes your employment objective, how much experience you have, what your specialty is, and any other important information you want them to know.
  2. Prepare your resume for electronic search.
    You may not even have a human being looking over your resume before the interview; the hiring institution may be using an electronic search to find only individuals who mention certain areas of expertise in their resumes. You must include these keywords in the text of your resume. If you’ve done a lot of work with kids, make sure you use the word pediatrics. If you’ve worked the ER, use the words emergency department or emergency medicine. If you don’t list these keywords, you may get overlooked.
  3. Showcase your strengths by using the right format.
    If you’re fresh out of nursing school, you don’t want to fashion your resume in a manner that emphasizes your lack of experience. Highlight your academic honors and accomplishments, licensure, and clinical rotations. If you do have the experience, spell out not only your job duties, but things you did to go above and beyond your job title. Were you a trainer? Did you help your department during JCAHO accreditation? Did you receive any commendations? Highlight the things that will show a potential employer that they’d be getting more bang for their buck by hiring you.
  4. Be specific.
    What type of facilities have you worked at? It’s not enough to list the name of your past employers and the dates you worked for them; there are literally thousands of facilities out there, and chances are that the hiring manager has no idea what sort of reputation any particular facility has. Was it an outpatient facility, general practice, intensive care? How many patients were on your caseload on any given day? What was your specialty? These are all important determinations to help a hiring manager know whether or not you’d be a good fit.

When was the last time you updated your resume? Do you have any additional tips that have helped you?

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Why Pursue a Graduate Degree in Special Education

by Howard Gerber on June 13, 2012

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It takes true love for the field of education and a dedication to special needs students to remain very long in the realm of special education. The hours are even longer than those of a classroom teacher, summer meetings are routine, the emotional turmoil from parents and distressed children can be overwhelming, and the monetary benefit is typically equal to that of a classroom teacher. Why then, would anyone want to put forth the effort and money required to pursue a graduate degree in the field of special education? The two reasons that immediately come to mind are knowledge and change. [continue reading…]

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Prescription to Nonprescription: A Pharmacist’s Role

by Howard Gerber on April 23, 2012

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The FDA is considering expanding the definition of what can be considered a nonprescription drug. The reasoning behind the possible new policy is the FDA wants to streamline healthcare. Studies have found that up to 20% of patients will not get prescriptions filled or they will not return to a physician to get prescriptions for refills. Moving some of the most common medications to nonprescription status would decrease the number of visits to physicians and may increase the likelihood that patients who need these medications will get them. [continue reading…]

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From Nursing Homes to Home Care

by Howard Gerber on March 19, 2012

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Geriatric nursing may soon look very different than it has in the past. Previously, those in the field of geriatric nursing could expect to find employment in nursing homes and home health care facilities. However, with recent changes to Medicaid and Medicare, the home health care model may soon become much more prominent. Policy officials are now beginning to feel that full time medical assistance within a nursing home facility is not warranted for many of the patients who would have previously been candidates for these services. Instead, they are looking to the home health care model, where only specific services are provided within the home of the patient. [continue reading…]

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Holiday Blues

by Howard Gerber on December 20, 2011

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While it may not be true that suicide increases around the holiday season, it is true that many people do experience what has become known as holiday blues. This may be because people are more aware of their feelings at this time of the year or because their expectations of happiness are higher during the holidays and so they feel like they are sadder than they “should” be. Regardless, the triggers for these feelings seem to be similar regardless of the patient and many of the non-medical treatment options are viable for most patients as well. Of course it is important to remember that not all patients who feel depressed will have these “holiday blues” and may be in need of more intense treatment. [continue reading…]

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National Hand Washing Awareness

by Howard Gerber on December 13, 2011

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National Hand Washing Awareness Week was December 4-10 this year. This was a health holiday every business and school can get behind and support. No matter what your profession, you can help spread the message throughout the year that will benefit all of your clients, patients, or students as well as their families and your entire community. [continue reading…]

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